Review: Sophie’s Squash

The season is changing now almost as fast as a toddler’s mood. Enjoy a bit of both with the adorable Sophie’s Squash by Pat Zietlow Miller and Anne Wilsdorf.

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Precocious Sophie picks out a butternut squash for supper at the farmers’ market, but by evening the huggable fruit has become her best friend. Resisting her parents’ attempts to eat her new pal, Sophie names the squash Bernice and takes her everywhere. The two enjoy a friendship despite her parents’ warnings that a squash can’t last forever; until finally Sophie herself has to admit that her time with the squishy Bernice is coming to an end. But acting on a bit of advice from a farmer at the market, Sophie chooses a selfless resolution that even surprises her with the, ahem, fruit it ultimately bears.

Cheery pictures illustrate the sweet family themes in this story. Aside from the obvious – and totally understandable – scenario of a preschooler connecting with an unexpected object, we also glimpse a family sharing in wholesome activities and facing dilemmas in a healthy way. Both parents take Sophie to the market and the library, and discuss with her options for the inevitable end of her bosom buddy. Their suggestions as they allow her to reach the conclusion herself are evidence of a thoughtful family atmosphere (cooking the squash together, or donating it to a food pantry). Sophie’s eventual solution reflects the loving care that she receives herself.

It’s also very jolly to see what fun a child can have with an inanimate friend: tea parties and role-playing and tumbling down hills. In a world where kids are increasingly “wired”, Sophie is refreshingly unplugged. Her playful adoration of her vegetative chum spans the seasons; and when she decides to give Bernice what a squash really needs, she makes a joyful discovery about the circle of life.

This gently humorous book is a fun seasonal story-time choice for preschoolers, but readers from toddlers up through the early grades can enjoy the sweet adventures of Sophie and her squash.

Note: In the follow-up book Sophie’s Squash Goes To School our imaginative heroine has difficulty making friends at school, but learns a valuable lesson from a new friend – and this one is human.

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: The Apple Doll by Elisa Kleven (This lovely out-of-print story also has instructions for making your own dried-apple doll.)

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Review: My Garden

In this part of the world the bounty of vegetable gardens is reaching its peak, and we should not let summer pass without one more imaginative gardening story. Thus I present you with My Garden by Kevin Henkes.

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A little girl enjoys helping in her mother’s garden; but when she considers what a garden of her own might be like, she comes up with something quite different. Permanent blooms in changing colors, buttons growing on vines, glowing strawberries and sprouting sea shells are just a few of the delights conjured by this fanciful girl. In fact, with invisible carrots and jellybean bushes, it’s probably anyone’s perfect garden. When the little girl is called in for the night she takes a chance on her own magic, and readers are given a hopeful glimpse of her gardening success.

This story, so charmingly illustrated by the author, is a pleasing expression of a child’s imagination. She clearly enjoys spending time with her mother, and has learned more than a thing or two; yet she is permitted to dig and dream, improve and imagine all on her own. She takes those timeless skills and gives them a cheerful twist. The wonder she creates would take even the grumpiest gardener back to the halcyon days of a childhood summer.

My Garden is a dreamy readaloud for toddlers through the early grades. The pictures are large and simple enough – and the story short enough – to make this a very good choice to read out to a group at a story time or birthday party. For children who can sit in your lap and see closer, there is a small detail which I particularly appreciate: both the sketched outlines of the illustrations and the words of the text are printed in a dark royal blue rather than black. It’s a subtle difference, but it makes these pages tremendously inviting.

May you enjoy these last few days of summer in a garden, with a book in your hands and a child in your lap.

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: All In A Day by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Nikki McClure

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Series Review: The Cobble Street Cousins

Guiding a budding reader into chapter books can be a confusing experience, so finding an appealing series is like striking gold. If this sounds familiar, you might try The Cobble Street Cousins series by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Wendy Anderson Halperin.

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This series of six short chapter books follows three cousins who live with their lovable Aunt Lucy for a year while their parents tour with the ballet. Tess, Rosie, and Lily have very different talents and interests, but they get up to tremendous fun living together in the attic of Aunt Lucy’s old house. Each book features a creative activity that the girls take on together as they make friends and memories in their temporary home: a cookie-baking business, a community newspaper, and finally, preparations for a very special wedding. The individual stories stand alone but the series arc expands encouragingly on the girls’ relationships with neighbors young and old. It’s hard not to want to go along with the three when they take tea cakes and oranges to visit old Mrs. White.

If these books have a fault, it is perhaps that they are too idyllic. It’s difficult to imagine a community of adults dropping everything to attend a program put on by the new neighborhood kids, or the local nonagenarian taking them all in for sewing lessons. If the three friends struggle with missing their parents or adjusting to their situation, no mention of it is made. And apparently on Cobble Street there is always time for tea and cookies. Unrealistic? Probably. But wouldn’t it be pleasant if the world could be just a little more like that?

Children learn to read at different rates, and they only need the ready-for-chapters level for a short time. But chances are that, even as they strike out with more independence, they are still at an age that values reassurance. Some children who can read beyond their years are frightened by coming-of-age themes like playground bullying or the death of a parent. These issues are real and there is time enough (and plenty of good books) to deal with them. But if you know a child who is eager to read and still has that precious innocence, you may safely trust this series.

These books, so sweetly illustrated with Halperin’s lovely drawings, will resonate primarily with girls from ages six to nine. They are a welcome reprieve from the somewhat sassy heroines who tend to fill the genre, and will beautifully bridge that gap between easy-readers and the joy of children’s chapter books. Just don’t be surprised if your daughter asks to bake cookies for an elderly neighbor.

If you liked this series you might also enjoy: The Mandie Collection by Lois Gladys Leppard

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