Review: Over the River and Through the Wood

It’s almost time for Thanksgiving; and with it a flurry of activity as families travel across the world or across the yard to share a day with one another. Wherever you’re bound this year, members of every generation can recollect their own beloved traditions with Over the River and Through the Wood: A Thanksgiving Poem by Lydia Maria Child and illustrated by Christopher Manson.

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This striking volume contains the original words to the well-known tune, telling the story by couplets. An eager little boy peeps out the back of the sleigh (circa 1840) as his family makes their way to Grandfather’s house for Thanksgiving. As they pass through a bustling village and the still, snow-drifted countryside, he can hardly contain his excitement. Finally in the evening they come to a farm, and the boy runs into the open arms of his grandmother. The family sits down to a traditional feast, and the book concludes with all the verses and the music for the song.

The unique woodcut illustrations are a brilliant match for this story. Early American scenes come to life in a popular medium of the time. Bundled figures in shades of brown seem natural and even cheerful as they work, surrounded by the clear brightness of a snowy day. As the subjects drive along we see folks skating, sailing, ice-fishing, logging, horseshoeing; and with them we can almost feel the wind that “stings the toes and bites the nose”. The famous dapple-gray horse keeps brisk pace with the song as our impatient little boy leans forward in all the hope of good things at Grandma’s house – and so do we.

For many Americans such scenes are a part of our collective memory, if not our actual experience. Of course not everyone recognizes the sting of cold air in late November, nor even the warmth of a grandmother’s embrace. Even fewer have been out visiting in a sleigh. But however and wherever we celebrate now, Thanksgiving is still a valuable part of our national identity; and we can all recognize the desire to be with those who love us most. An idyllic old-fashioned setting is not just empty nostalgia or a narrow vision, but an invitation to renew our dedication to our own homes and families.

This book gives fresh insight to familiar words, and provides strong visual cues for sensations that children will recognize: the tingling feeling as you take a gulp of cold air, the warm smell of food cooking, the sound of laughter when friends meet, the anxious hug of someone you’ve been missing. With emphasis on the anticipation and joy of a family gathering, Manson’s rendering would be a delight to read aloud when squirmy little guests start wondering if dinner will ever be ready. Or big ones, for that matter.

Happy Thanksgiving!

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: Sharing the Bread: An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving Story by Pat Zietlow Miller and Jill McElmurry

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Review: Book Girl, by Sarah Clarkson

Today I have a special find for my female bibliophile friends… and ladies, this book is especially for you. Yes, it will ultimately benefit the children in your life, but this one is a treasure for you. I am thrilled to share with you Book Girl by writer, speaker, and blogger Sarah Clarkson.

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This book is a celebration of the sisterhood enjoyed by women who love to read. Encouragingly written from a Christian perspective, it discusses the intelligent empathy that women develop when they are thoughtful lifelong readers, and the values they impart by sharing good books with one another. For by reading we not only encounter our own thoughts and feelings, but we engage with people, places, and ideas far beyond our own imagining. We are shaped by what we read; so we ought to read what is good and true and beautiful.

Inspired by her mother’s example and the recent birth of her own daughter, Clarkson’s enthusiasm for quality reading is contagious. She offers advice for “book girls” of all stages, including suggestions for how to make reading time a pleasant priority. As she acknowledges, some of us were born reading and haven’t stopped; many have been distracted by life and don’t read as much as we would like; others have never developed the habit but wonder what people love about all those printed pages. Wherever you fall – and whatever your age – this book is for you.

The author makes a compelling case for not only why women should read, but what we should read: books that form as a whole person and nourish us through the seasons of life. Above all, books that prepare us to become the heroine in our own story, embracing and giving all that is good to the world.

To that end, Clarkson has here shared with readers many of her favorite and most formative reading recommendations. Her collection is finer than gold. She painstakingly arranges fiction, biographies, spiritual classics and more into more than twenty book lists. With uplifting accounts of how each theme supports the overall balance of the reading life, she goes on to offer a short review of each title. The scope is breathtaking and includes everything from Wendell Berry to P.G. Wodehouse. Other favorites include C.S. Lewis, Charlotte Brontë, Madeleine L’Engle, Lucy Maud Montgomery, and dozens more for children and adults.

The book could easily be savored in its entirety or in useful tidbits, but it is not one to lay aside after one reading. It is made to be revisited frequently over many years, as a wholesome source of inspiration. (I am quite serious about “many years”; there is enough here to keep the most serious bluestocking busy for a long time.)

Most of my reviews are for children’s books, but this one is an investment in all of us. It is by being readers that we teach our children to become readers, and share with them the exquisite graces of the reading life. Book Girl is all of that and more, for it nudges us to fill our hearts and heads with the very best – and then to share it with the world.

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: Caught Up In A Story: Fostering a Storyformed Life of Great Books & Imagination with Your Children, also by Sarah Clarkson

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Review: Uncle Jed’s Barbershop

Sometimes a well-done children’s story is the best way to introduce complex and difficult issues, even reminding adults what is really at the heart of the matter. The loving tale of Uncle Jed’s Barbershop, written by Margaree King Mitchell and illustrated by James Ransome, is one of these.

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The story is told by Sarah Jean – great-niece of sweet Uncle Jed – in a readable storytelling style. Growing up in the American South just before the Great Depression, her Uncle Jed was the only black barber in the county – and by extension, the only barber who would cut a black man’s hair. He traveled to his patrons on horseback, accepting what payment his neighbors could offer. Little Sarah Jean loved his visits. Uncle Jed would tell her all about the beautiful barbershop he was saving up to open one day. Nobody ever thought he would, because times were hard and a black man was at a disadvantage to say the least. But Sarah Jean dreamed right along with him.

Then little Sarah Jean fell desperately sick, and doctors would only perform the necessary operation to save her if the family paid cash up front. Only one person in the family had that kind of money, and he didn’t hesitate to give it. Jed lost his life savings a second time when the Great Depression hit, but no matter what obstacles rose between him and his goals he kept on dreaming, and he taught a wide-eyed little girl to do the same.

Uncle Jed’s kind smile comes to life in both the text and the gorgeous paintings of this winsome book. The difficulties of segregation and racial injustice are not minimized or sugarcoated, but are treated gently and respectfully. Some details should be discussed with children upon reading it, such as the separate waiting rooms at the hospital and why the doctors treated white patients first. But the story is not dominated by these very real hardships; like Uncle Jed, it rises above them. The most remarkable feature of this book is the character of Uncle Jed; a man who faced oppression and injustice with hard work, dignity, kindness, hope, and a generous love of his family and community.

I’ll leave it to you to find out whether Uncle Jed ever opens that fancy barber shop, but I will tell you the ending warms the heart. The challenging themes of inequality represented in the book will be more easily explained to children age five and up, but the overwhelming message of goodness is perfect for all ages.

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: Chicken Sunday by Patricia Polacco

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