Series Review: Mr. Putter & Tabby

It is finally summer, and if you have a fledgling reader at home for a few months you might be looking for a pleasant easy-reader series to help them practice until school begins again. I highly recommend Mr. Putter & Tabby, written by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Arthur Howard.

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It all begins with Mr. Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea. Elderly Mr. Putter lives alone in a grand old house. He enjoys tending his garden, listening to opera, and taking afternoon tea; but he longs for a friend with whom he can share his placid retirement. He decides to get a cat, but feels some alarm after encountering the boisterous kittens at the pet shop. He goes on to the shelter in search of a more suitable companion. He finds a feline just as old, creaky, and hard of hearing as he is. He names her Tabby, and their (very sedate) adventures commence.

We discover in the first book that Mr. Putter and Tabby are very content in each other’s company. They share their breakfast, tinker in the garden, and sit together in the evenings before bed. And they take lots of naps. Life is very nearly perfect. In subsequent books they meet the old lady next door, and their serene existence is delightfully jarred. Mrs. Teaberry is fun, sweet, and spunky; and along with her willful dog Zeke she brings joy to her dignified neighbors. Mr. Putter and Tabby find their daily routine happily interrupted by birthday parties, knitting clubs, boating excursions, and ballroom dancing. Mr. Putter always greets these suggestions with some reluctance, but ends up realizing that a little fun was just what he needed.

These self-contained stories are charming and well-written. Each is divided into three short chapters, so a young reader can sit down to however much they are comfortable reading at one time. The language is repetitive enough to be helpful, but varied enough to create intelligent and engaging stories. Cheerful, humorous illustrations provide readers with useful prompts and a genuine affection for the lovable characters. (Mr. Putter’s pathetic expressions before Tabby comes into his home are, quite simply, adorable.)

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A great many early reader series feature juvenile characters that are meant to appeal to children. Often fast and a bit sassy, such characters are not to the taste of every family. Rylant has created something quite different for new readers to enjoy. Mr. Putter savors the simple comforts that make a home, and values the little efforts that build a friendship. These books are filled with warm soup, home-baked goodies, copper tea kettles, comfy chairs and pots of flowers. The conversation is always very correct (Zeke is acknowledged to be, at times, “a bother”), and Mr. Putter’s wry reticence is teased along by Mrs. Teaberry’s general enthusiasm. They do practical things to care for each other, and enjoy all the little moments that make up a life well lived. And as for Tabby: “She was old, and beautiful things meant more to her.”

The many books in this series are all delightful, and they are readily available in libraries so you can keep your young bibliophile reading all summer long.

If you liked this series you might also enjoy: Poppleton, also written by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Mark Teague

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Review: The Forever Garden

April showers have finally given way to May flowers; and like food and friendship and other good things, flowers are meant to be shared. Discover the lifegiving legacy that a simple garden can bestow with The Forever Garden, written by Laurel Snyder and illustrated by Samantha Cotterill.

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A cheerful, eccentric lady named Honey is devoted to her garden, and tends it in all weathers. The girl next door does not always see what Honey sees in the garden, but she likes to visit and work alongside her neighbor and friend. Honey shares the garden’s bounty with the girl and her mother: fresh veggies, eggs, and “bouquets of funny things.” They enjoy meals and warm evenings together, until Honey suddenly puts her house up for sale.

Heartbroken, Honey’s young friend does not understand how she can leave her garden, and wonders why she continues to plant berries that she will not be there to harvest. Honey reminds her that a garden belongs to no single person, but that as each gardener enjoys the fruits that were planted by others, so the seeds each person plants are for others to enjoy in later seasons. When a new family moves into Honey’s old home, they find a new friend next door, ready to help them with the garden.

Based loosely on a tale from the Talmud, this charming modern story calls attention not only to the physical and emotional sustenance that a garden gives, but to the relationships that it nurtures as well. Neighborliness is sometimes hard to come by in the age of air-conditioning, supermarkets, and social media; but Honey proves how valuable one kindly example can be. She lavishes attention on her tidy little plantings, but also on the lonely little girl next to her. She teaches her about gardening and about life, about humble self-sufficiency and reaching out to others. Her story is a celebration of hard work and homegrown abundance, of simple joys and time well spent, of appreciation for the past and hope for the future, and of friendship across fences and generations.

The Forever Garden is beautifully told. Readers will recognize the sights, sounds, and tastes in the garden; and also the feelings that go with losing and making friends. The pictures are colorful and sweet, bringing the wisdom of this ancient tale to our own neighborhoods. It would be particularly special for a child under the age of ten to read this with a grandparent, neighbor, or friend.

Such seeds, once planted, will surely prosper.

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: Whose Garden Is It? written by Mary Ann Hoberman and illustrated by Jane Dyer (This title is sadly out of print, but is well worth requesting from your local library.)

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Series Review: The Mysterious Benedict Society

The longer nights of autumn provide a cozy opportunity to begin a page-turning book series, and I have eagerly devoured this one: The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart.

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Following orphan Reynard Muldoon, the series brings together four children of exceptional abilities who share one other feature: they are all alone. They all answer an advertisement that promises adventure to children with certain unique qualities; and upon passing a very peculiar examination they meet Mr. Benedict and learn of his efforts to uncover and resist an unknown evil. The children accept their mission, without knowing fully what will be expected of them, or whether they can even trust this strange benefactor. They soon discover that the threat to their world is indeed very real, and they will have to work together quickly to find a way to stop it.

As Reynie hesitatingly forms relationships with Kate, Constance, and Sticky, he realizes that each of them will have to face their fears and, to some extent, overcome their own independent instincts in order to face a common foe. They must rely not only on their skills, but on each other. Trust does not come easily to the foursome, but it grows alongside a mutual respect as they work to solve a mystery that bears enormous consequences for the world in which, previously, they had no real home.

What makes these stories so fascinating is that it does not take place in a magical world; the children’s abilities are not supernatural, but powers of critical thinking and longing for truth. The protagonists are a bit like juvenile Sherlocks, reasoning their way through a tangle of problems. The author builds on an impressive range of facts to help his subjects along, and in so doing creates a place where both knowledge and deduction are celebrated. The writing itself is intelligent, with a thrilling vocabulary and appreciation for the most minute detail.

These stories certainly make it cool to be the smart kid, but they don’t deny a young person’s corresponding emotional or personal development. Reynie is a deeply thoughtful child who is keenly considerate of what others might be thinking or feeling. When he faces the temptation to do what seems most expedient for his own security, his innate loyalty ultimately puts the welfare of others first. As the children learn to get along, they all learn that it takes patience, kindness, and some sacrifice to care for another person. The author traces these developments with a deft sensitivity that is not the least bit cloying.

The exceptional plot is full of risk, riddles, and suspense; and I dare not give it away. Suffice it to say that you will be guessing until the last page. The antagonist proves to be quite diabolical, and at times the play between the themes of abandonment and trust is truly nerve-wracking. Yet the discomfort is warranted as the reader subconsciously begins to address these questions of human longing and achievement in her own mind. The end is wholly satisfying as each of the children, having played their own unique part, finds a place of genuine belonging.

Also striking in this series is the way the young operatives are treated by the mysterious Mr. Benedict and his bizarre staff; the children are seen very much as fully formed individuals, and accorded the respect of equals. Such a partnership is unusual in books for this age group, which tend to develop tension between youth and adults.

The friendships established in the first book endure adventures that will interest children from the age of eight or nine on up through the teen years, but I would particularly commend the whole series to children of a mature and sensitive nature. They will find encouragement to press through their fears and realize their potential as vital members of society. The series would make an excellent gift for a child who struggles to find their place, or needs reassurance that they have one.

Happy reading, Families.

If you liked this series you might also enjoy: The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall

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