Review: Tell Me A Dragon

Children have the most intriguing ability to mingle the factual with the fantastic, as do some of the best children’s authors and illustrators. Jackie Morris has created a glorious flight of fantasy with her stunning work Tell Me A Dragon.

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On each splendid page of this colorful picture book a different human character introduces his or her dragon. Yes, dragon. The people hail from all around the world: from history and folklore and mythology and from perfectly ordinary modern life. They live in castles, gypsy caravans and city skylines; some are from the desert and some are from the sea, some wear magnificent robes and some wear pajamas. But they each have a magnificent dragon.

These dragons are breathtaking. They are different colors and sizes, paying homage to the way cultures all around the world have imagined their dragons for centuries. They swirl through their lush surroundings but they are evidently quite tame, always in perfect cooperation with their humans. They are ridden, fed, petted and coddled. And they are described in one or two sentences that quite fulfill the dreams of any dragon-lover.

As readers delight in this parade of dragons so gorgeously depicted, they get a certain sense that a dragon is nothing to fear, but rather a faithful companion. There is something winsome, loyal and noble in the eyes of each. Sure enough, we finally meet one whiskered dragon guarding a clutch of eggs “so that somewhere in the wide world there will always be DRAGONS.” Looking at the little one just hatching, we feel that this can only be a good thing.

In case any little readers still have their doubts, the last dragon is curled lovingly around a child’s pillow, watching the door and warding off bad dreams. Even the most trepidatious heart will surely then be ready for the marvelous final spread and the invitation to imagine dragons of our very own.

The words in this book are simple but rich. It doesn’t take long to read, but the jewel-like illustrations welcome readers to pore over every luscious detail. We see more than just the twirling majesty of the dragons; we see faces, landscapes, dreams and ideas that span space and time. The careful adult line between fiction and reality is erased and readers are encouraged to shape their own dreams into the form of a beautiful dragon.

For the scientifically-minded, newer editions of Tell Me A Dragon feature several pages of facts and field notes about dragons at the end of the book. Even the endpages are pure magic; be sure to see if little ones can spot the difference between the front and the back.

A lavish readaloud for your thoughtful dreamers and fact-memorizers alike, this lovely book is a superb choice for every age group. To my knowledge it is not currently in print in the United States, but is well worth finding at your local library.

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: Dragonology by Dr. Ernest Drake

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Review: A World Full of Animal Stories

Usually I like to review a series at the beginning of each month, but this time I want to share a collection of stories all in one bright volume. Since Christmas my children and I have enjoyed delving into A World Full of Animal Stories: 50 Folktales and Legends written by Angela McAllister and illustrated by Aitch.

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I love folk stories; they show us how to respect what is different and celebrate what is the same about other peoples and places. This book is like a treasure chest. The tales are organized according to their continent of origin (Africa, Asia, North America, South America, Europe, Australia and Oceania) and then each is identified more specifically by the modern country or tribe from which it came (Ghana, Brazil, Lakota, et cetera). The range of donor nations could always be broader, and I would like to have seen a fuller representation from South America, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East; but there is a good mix of cultures included that will certainly encourage young readers to stretch their minds around the globe.

The stories are told in the traditional spirit; most are witty moral fables or cautionary tales that encourage cleverness and punish pride. In most of the tales the animals can talk; in some they interact with humans and in others they deal only with each other. There is an emotive blend of humor and tragedy, wit and foolishness, lessons learned and opportunities lost. The result is a story for every mood and a universal reflection of this life we all live.

Each story is tightly packed on one to three pages, and can generally be read within ten minutes. They are well-written and expressive, paced to build the climax without giving the story away. Along with “The Ugly Duckling” and one or two other tales that are well known in the United States, children meet the fabled West African trickster Ananse, a Bear Prince and a horse named Dapplegrim. With titles like “Why the Warthog is Ugly” and “The Owl of Cowlyd Coomb” it is undeniably hard to stop at just one.

If I have a complaint about this book, it concerns the ratio of pictures to text. The illustrations vary pleasingly in size and scale, and portray the stories with brilliance; I would only like to see more of them, and I suspect that little folks would also enjoy more images to enliven the words they’re hearing. But this does not detract from the stories or imply that they are boring; it’s simply that I could never get enough of these gorgeous pictures.

This treasury would make a thoughtful gift, as it can easily provide hours of quality reading for everyone: from toddlers first learning their animals to middle schoolers beginning to appreciate just how big the world is. I am also looking forward to finding a copy of McAllister’s other book: A Year Full of Stories: 52 Folk Tales and Legends from Around the World. This volume is illustrated by Christopher Corr, and appears to be just as tantalizingly vibrant as the animal stories.

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Happy reading!

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: National Geographic Kids Stories: HeartwarmingTrue Tales from the Animal Kingdom, written by Jane Yolen and her children, and illustrated by Jui Ishida

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Review: Chanticleer and the Fox

“When April with its showers sweet/The drought of March has pierced to the root…” …well when it is that time of year, it is also time to re-read these words from the prologue and a few select favorites from Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. While many of the tales are not suitable for children in their original form, Barbara Cooney proves that it’s never too early to love the classics with her brilliant adaptation of Chanticleer and the Fox.

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Abridged from the Nun’s Priest’s Tale, this clever rendition tells the cautionary story of Chanticleer, an imperious rooster. He belongs to a poor widow, who cheerfully scrapes a meager living from her small farmstead. The beautiful Chanticleer is her pride and joy, and he rules the farmyard with dignity. One night he has a dream, warning him of danger in his little kingdom, but his favorite hen persuades him to disregard the premonition. He struts about as usual that morning, then meets a flattering – and strangely familiar – visitor. When proud Chanticleer is snatched by the cunning stranger he is pursued by a riotous entourage, but it will take his own wits to save his colorful feathers.

Cooney’s sanitized version of this beloved tale is tremendous fun to read with children. She has retained the sound of the Middle English language, as if a bard was reciting it for a crowd. Her vibrant illustrations won the Caldecott Medal in 1959, and the vivid colors with homey black detailing still feel fresh today. In short order she gives readers an inviting glimpse of the widow’s simple life with an array of favorite animals, and little listeners will delight in recognizing the Fox before Chanticleer does.

A lively springtime choice that is a little out of the ordinary, Chanticleer is grand to read aloud with preschoolers and children in the primary grades. You’ll need your best read-aloud voice; for adults unaccustomed to the style the language might feel stilted, but it is not difficult for young ears to comprehend and lends a decided air of adventure to this merry barnyard tale (do expect to define a few new words, like “debonair”). Barbara Cooney has beautifully preserved the historic yet familiar appeal of this charming fable that has kept readers returning for centuries. But whether you’ll be rooting for Chanticleer or the Fox, I cannot say.

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: Petook: An Easter Story written by Caryll Houselander and illustrated by Tomie dePaola

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