It is finally summer, and if you have a fledgling reader at home for a few months you might be looking for a pleasant easy-reader series to help them practice until school begins again. I highly recommend Mr. Putter & Tabby, written by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Arthur Howard.

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It all begins with Mr. Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea. Elderly Mr. Putter lives alone in a grand old house. He enjoys tending his garden, listening to opera, and taking afternoon tea; but he longs for a friend with whom he can share his placid retirement. He decides to get a cat, but feels some alarm after encountering the boisterous kittens at the pet shop. He goes on to the shelter in search of a more suitable companion. He finds a feline just as old, creaky, and hard of hearing as he is. He names her Tabby, and their (very sedate) adventures commence.

We discover in the first book that Mr. Putter and Tabby are very content in each other’s company. They share their breakfast, tinker in the garden, and sit together in the evenings before bed. And they take lots of naps. Life is very nearly perfect. In subsequent books they meet the old lady next door, and their serene existence is delightfully jarred. Mrs. Teaberry is fun, sweet, and spunky; and along with her willful dog Zeke she brings joy to her dignified neighbors. Mr. Putter and Tabby find their daily routine happily interrupted by birthday parties, knitting clubs, boating excursions, and ballroom dancing. Mr. Putter always greets these suggestions with some reluctance, but ends up realizing that a little fun was just what he needed.

These self-contained stories are charming and well-written. Each is divided into three short chapters, so a young reader can sit down to however much they are comfortable reading at one time. The language is repetitive enough to be helpful, but varied enough to create intelligent and engaging stories. Cheerful, humorous illustrations provide readers with useful prompts and a genuine affection for the lovable characters. (Mr. Putter’s pathetic expressions before Tabby comes into his home are, quite simply, adorable.)

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A great many early reader series feature juvenile characters that are meant to appeal to children. Often fast and a bit sassy, such characters are not to the taste of every family. Rylant has created something quite different for new readers to enjoy. Mr. Putter savors the simple comforts that make a home, and values the little efforts that build a friendship. These books are filled with warm soup, home-baked goodies, copper tea kettles, comfy chairs and pots of flowers. The conversation is always very correct (Zeke is acknowledged to be, at times, “a bother”), and Mr. Putter’s wry reticence is teased along by Mrs. Teaberry’s general enthusiasm. They do practical things to care for each other, and enjoy all the little moments that make up a life well lived. And as for Tabby: “She was old, and beautiful things meant more to her.”

The many books in this series are all delightful, and they are readily available in libraries so you can keep your young bibliophile reading all summer long.

If you liked this series you might also enjoy: Poppleton, also written by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Mark Teague

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