Review: Tell Me A Dragon

Children have the most intriguing ability to mingle the factual with the fantastic, as do some of the best children’s authors and illustrators. Jackie Morris has created a glorious flight of fantasy with her stunning work Tell Me A Dragon.

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On each splendid page of this colorful picture book a different human character introduces his or her dragon. Yes, dragon. The people hail from all around the world: from history and folklore and mythology and from perfectly ordinary modern life. They live in castles, gypsy caravans and city skylines; some are from the desert and some are from the sea, some wear magnificent robes and some wear pajamas. But they each have a magnificent dragon.

These dragons are breathtaking. They are different colors and sizes, paying homage to the way cultures all around the world have imagined their dragons for centuries. They swirl through their lush surroundings but they are evidently quite tame, always in perfect cooperation with their humans. They are ridden, fed, petted and coddled. And they are described in one or two sentences that quite fulfill the dreams of any dragon-lover.

As readers delight in this parade of dragons so gorgeously depicted, they get a certain sense that a dragon is nothing to fear, but rather a faithful companion. There is something winsome, loyal and noble in the eyes of each. Sure enough, we finally meet one whiskered dragon guarding a clutch of eggs “so that somewhere in the wide world there will always be DRAGONS.” Looking at the little one just hatching, we feel that this can only be a good thing.

In case any little readers still have their doubts, the last dragon is curled lovingly around a child’s pillow, watching the door and warding off bad dreams. Even the most trepidatious heart will surely then be ready for the marvelous final spread and the invitation to imagine dragons of our very own.

The words in this book are simple but rich. It doesn’t take long to read, but the jewel-like illustrations welcome readers to pore over every luscious detail. We see more than just the twirling majesty of the dragons; we see faces, landscapes, dreams and ideas that span space and time. The careful adult line between fiction and reality is erased and readers are encouraged to shape their own dreams into the form of a beautiful dragon.

For the scientifically-minded, newer editions of Tell Me A Dragon feature several pages of facts and field notes about dragons at the end of the book. Even the endpages are pure magic; be sure to see if little ones can spot the difference between the front and the back.

A lavish readaloud for your thoughtful dreamers and fact-memorizers alike, this lovely book is a superb choice for every age group. To my knowledge it is not currently in print in the United States, but is well worth finding at your local library.

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: Dragonology by Dr. Ernest Drake

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Series Review: Mr. Putter & Tabby

It is finally summer, and if you have a fledgling reader at home for a few months you might be looking for a pleasant easy-reader series to help them practice until school begins again. I highly recommend Mr. Putter & Tabby, written by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Arthur Howard.

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It all begins with Mr. Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea. Elderly Mr. Putter lives alone in a grand old house. He enjoys tending his garden, listening to opera, and taking afternoon tea; but he longs for a friend with whom he can share his placid retirement. He decides to get a cat, but feels some alarm after encountering the boisterous kittens at the pet shop. He goes on to the shelter in search of a more suitable companion. He finds a feline just as old, creaky, and hard of hearing as he is. He names her Tabby, and their (very sedate) adventures commence.

We discover in the first book that Mr. Putter and Tabby are very content in each other’s company. They share their breakfast, tinker in the garden, and sit together in the evenings before bed. And they take lots of naps. Life is very nearly perfect. In subsequent books they meet the old lady next door, and their serene existence is delightfully jarred. Mrs. Teaberry is fun, sweet, and spunky; and along with her willful dog Zeke she brings joy to her dignified neighbors. Mr. Putter and Tabby find their daily routine happily interrupted by birthday parties, knitting clubs, boating excursions, and ballroom dancing. Mr. Putter always greets these suggestions with some reluctance, but ends up realizing that a little fun was just what he needed.

These self-contained stories are charming and well-written. Each is divided into three short chapters, so a young reader can sit down to however much they are comfortable reading at one time. The language is repetitive enough to be helpful, but varied enough to create intelligent and engaging stories. Cheerful, humorous illustrations provide readers with useful prompts and a genuine affection for the lovable characters. (Mr. Putter’s pathetic expressions before Tabby comes into his home are, quite simply, adorable.)

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A great many early reader series feature juvenile characters that are meant to appeal to children. Often fast and a bit sassy, such characters are not to the taste of every family. Rylant has created something quite different for new readers to enjoy. Mr. Putter savors the simple comforts that make a home, and values the little efforts that build a friendship. These books are filled with warm soup, home-baked goodies, copper tea kettles, comfy chairs and pots of flowers. The conversation is always very correct (Zeke is acknowledged to be, at times, “a bother”), and Mr. Putter’s wry reticence is teased along by Mrs. Teaberry’s general enthusiasm. They do practical things to care for each other, and enjoy all the little moments that make up a life well lived. And as for Tabby: “She was old, and beautiful things meant more to her.”

The many books in this series are all delightful, and they are readily available in libraries so you can keep your young bibliophile reading all summer long.

If you liked this series you might also enjoy: Poppleton, also written by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Mark Teague

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Review: The Wall

Memorial Day is just around the corner, and with it comes an opportunity to discuss the reason for this holiday with youngsters. An insightful story can aid these challenging conversations, and The Wall – written by Eve Bunting and illustrated by Ronald Himler – is one of the best for this purpose.

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A little boy visits the iconic Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. with his father. They walk the length of that shiny black wall, looking for a very special name. As they go along, searching together, the boy observes other visitors and the memorials they’ve left behind: a wounded veteran, a grieving couple, flags and flowers, notes and pictures. He runs his hand along that wall, noticing how it looks and how it feels.

At last they find it. They run their fingers over the name of their father and grandfather. They take a rubbing, leave a photograph, and talk together in voices thick with emotion. The boy expresses his sadness to his father, who responds with loving sympathy towards his son but also pride in the legacy of his father. The two visitors are proud of this soldier, proud of his service; though they know that such pride can never take the place of the life he might have lived with them.

This book has been around for almost thirty years, but it is just as beautiful today as when it was featured on the old Reading Rainbow program. The boy makes all the observations of a curious child trying to make sense of big issues and jumbled feelings. With the empathetic support of his father – who is mourning his own father – he faces his sense of loss. These understanding exchanges are particularly poignant as the boy admits that he is proud of his grandfather, but would rather he could be with them.

Not only is this a gentle treatment of a difficult subject, it also provides children with a point of reference for respecting the agony and the sacrifice of others. They can see that there is no time limit on the pain of missing someone, but that it is good to talk about it and that there are appropriate ways to honor someone’s memory. And that we all owe a debt of gratitude to service members who perish in the line of duty; that we need not glorify the horrors of war to honor the sacrifice they made.

I find one image particularly helpful for children: as the boy and his father bow their heads before their loved one’s place on the Wall, a gaggle of schoolchildren pass by. Their loud and thoughtless questions contrast sharply with the quiet, more private behavior of the other visitors. The boy follows his father’s example and continues to stand with his head bowed until they are gone. A young reader will easily recognize that many things are turning over in the boy’s heart and mind, and that he needs time alone to be as close to his grandfather as he ever will be. This is very useful for helping children understand the importance of quiet and respectful conduct at any place of remembrance.

The wonderfully accomplished Eve Bunting has given teachers and caregivers an optimum means of presenting young children with reverent awareness of our fallen soldiers and empathy for their families. She does not attempt to convey the political motivations of any war, nor does she stoop to empty patriotism or saccharine emotions. But in the simplest way she does explore the complexities of love and loss, pride and sacrifice. She reminds us that society has given us respectful traditions for honoring the slain, if we will but claim them.

Himler’s soft, smudgy illustrations are a perfect match for the slim, meaningful text. He depicts a cold, overcast day as a backdrop for the enormity of the Wall and the perfect rows of names. The features of the people are slightly obscured within the paint, allowing them some privacy in their grief. This creative team opens up a new space in the heart of the little boy in the story, and will do so for your own children too.

Please don’t be afraid to talk with your children about Memorial Day. Let them take some flowers to the monument downtown, or wave a flag at the parade. After reading this story I hope they will want to.

It is up to us to teach them what has been, so they can grow to determine what will be.

If you liked this book you might also enjoy: Tucky Jo and Little Heart, written and illustrated by Patricia Polacco

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